I was astonished to find this short, not very well crafted detritus moving around facebook today, and I wanted to point out some issues.

Fostering doubt about something that has as stupendous a track record as that established by Dr. Scott Rosa is not just counterproductive, but represents a force that civilization has been struggling with for millenia – the barbarians. For centuries, civilizations that have reached a high level of development in the arts, in knowledge, in the sciences, have had to cope with destructive forces of the barbarian. Alexandria, Egypt, is a good example of a center of knowledge that was destroyed by barbarians masquerading as Christians. But the knowledge base shifted to the Arab world for over 1,000 years, until the western world had regained some stability.

The small-but-pungent article that has caught my attention is purportedly written by Dan Bernstein, who professes to be “an idiot.

But enough name calling! Lets get to the point.

Dr. Scott Rosa’s work is some of the most carefully documented work on the planet. His training is far beyond what most medical and chiropractic professionals receive, since it encompasses both the chiropractic note-set and the radiologist’s note-set, and the research associated with the upper cervical spine and its neurology. His work defines the most cutting edge of the cutting edge of science and supplies a need in an area that is seriously deficient in both chiropractic and medical research. In fact, the medical professionals that concentrate with him on the upper cervical spine have provided insights that also help to complete a better picture of the physiology of the brain and upper cervical spine.
It is upon this work that Danny wants to defecate. How unbecoming of a “journalist” that wants to engender respect among his public. (or does he?)

Bernstein’s first error is making a distinction between “real” doctors and “chiropractors.” All health care professionals have specialties. The pharmacist tends to know more about drugs than medical doctors. Orthopedic doctors tend to know more about setting a bone than the internist. Obstetricians tend to know more about birthing babies than Bariatric surgeons. Chiropractors know more about setting the nerve system right so their patients don’t need the drugs. Chiropractors know more about taking care of expectant mothers so that the baby doesn’t get stuck in a breach position. So there’s no such thing as a “real” doctor. It’s a fiction. It’s a comparison designed to polarize readers.

The second error that this journalist makes is dismissing MR technology as “fancy pictures.” I suppose he believes the moon landing was faked too? What about the round-earth “theory?” Does he think that’s suspect? This error casts doubt on the entire radiology profession. Bad idea.

The third error Dan makes is suggesting that Jim McMahon had a “placebo” experience. I wish upper cervical adjusting was that easy! It goes without saying that the boatloads of evidence captured by Dr. Rosa’s team describe specific structural changes by the upper cervical chiropractor which caused normalization of the physiology of the central nerve system. Too bad that Bernstein doesn’t understand any of it. We might be able to find someone who can explain it in simple enough terms.

The fourth and most egregious error here is casting a sinister light on the work of Dr. Scott Rosa and other upper cervical chiropractors, and on chiropractic in general. For over 100 years, individuals have experienced restoration of health and vigor and alleviation of many disorders with chiropractic care. Dr. Mayo, of the “famous” Mayo clinic, even took his ailing wife to Dr Palmer in Davenport when he realized his knowledge was limited. Currently, health professionals of every specialty refer patients to chiropractors when they understand the importance of the nerve system in physiology.

My recommendation is that Mr. Bernstein repent of his indiscretion and serve the public by actually promoting good scholarship and honest inquiry.